Sunday, October 24, 2010

India develops Laser Guided Bomb

India has developed its first Laser Guided Bomb (LGB), a weapon that can hit a target with greater accuracy, with technological support from Instrument Research and Development Establishment (IRDE).

The LGB uses a laser designator to mark or illuminate a target. The reflected laser light from the target is then detected by the seeker which sends signals to the weapon's control surfaces to guide it towards the designated point, he said.

Bangalore-based Aeronautics Development Establishment (ADE) has developed the guidance-kit for 1000-pound LGBs and these are designed to improve the accuracy of air-to-ground bombing by IAF.

The guidance kit of LGB consists of a computer control group (CCG), guidance canards attached to the front of the warhead for providing steering commands and a wing assembly attached to the aft end to provide lift.

India had already carried out two successful flight trials of LGB for the IAF to test the effectiveness of the guidance and control systems at Chandipur integrated test range in Orissa early this year.

LGBs are manoeuvrable, free-fall weapons requiring no electronic interconnect to the aircraft and attack the target with higher accuracy and reliability.

The LGBs were first developed by USA in 1960s. Later, Russia, France and Britain also developed them.

Sunday, October 10, 2010

India to launch series of military satellites

India plans to launch a series of indigenously built military satellites with surveillance, imaging and navigation capabilities to keep a watch on its neighbourhood and help guide cruise missiles, a top defence scientist said today.

"There will be a series of (defence) satellites. I cannot give you the numbers because they are classified," V K Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister, said here.

"Each year, you will find one or two satellites going up," added the Secretary, Defence R & D and Director General of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

Mostly, these satellites are dedicated to different defence applications and would have payloads which are for surveillance, imaging, navigation and communication.

"You should be able to see with very high resolution and precision the movements of troops and things like that (in the neighbourhood)," Saraswat said. "You should be able to see what are the new buildings and new facilities which have come up".

India would be able to send data and commands through these satellites to cruise missiles. "So it will have tremendous applications", he said.

These defence satellites would be indigenously built and launched from home soil only given the "security sensitivity", Saraswat stressed.

"The Army, Navy and Air Force each have their own requirement and it won't be appropriate to say how many each of them would need, due to security considerations," Saraswat said.

India has taken up development and launch of these defence satellites under its space-based surveillance programme, which has a road-map for setting up satellites for all applications for the Army, Navy and Air Force, he said.

"Now, this road-map has been given to the Department of Space and it is making its own schedule for launching these satellites. We have only one Department of Space and we have huge requirements...," he said.

Saraswat said India has already launched some satellites under this programme.

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Agni-II Plus getting ready

Scientists at the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) are working on an upgraded version of the Agni-II missile which will be more accurate and powerful than its predecessor.

The first tests for the Agni-II Plus will be carried out in two months. The new missile will be better than the Agni-II. It will perform better at various levels. The newer version will be better in terms of accuracy, strength and distance covered.

India developing highly secure operating system

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is developing a futuristic operating system to protect its sensitive data from cyber attacks, including hacking. This was announced by V.K. Saraswat.

Two software engineering centres located in Bangalore and New Delhi will be working on the operating system.

"Though it will be a real-time system, source code and architecture will be proprietary, giving us the exclusivity of owning a system unknown to foreign elements and protect our security system," Saraswat said after unveiling a training facility at the Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR), a defence lab in this tech hub. The new operating system will reduce the organisation's vulnerability and susceptibility to cyber attacks from internet. The first of its kind initiative will be used to secure the defence systems for computing in various research areas such as molecular computing and bio-molecular computing, used by the security formations.

50 scientists, 25 each for each of the centers pooled from various defence labs in Bangalore and New Delhi will be working on the project. The defence laboratory tied up with the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Bangalore, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Chennai apart from  other universities and industries.