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ISRO to launch German, French, British and Canadian satellites

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), that got global recognition for its successful launch of a mission to Mars, will now launch German, French, British and Canadaian satellites, a top official said.

"We will be launching EnMAP (Environmental Mapping and Analysis Programme) satellite belonging to Germany. The satellite will weigh around 800 kg," ISRO chairman K. Radhakrishnan told IANS in an interview.

The EnMAP is a hyperspectral satellite that would provide images of the Earth at regular intervals. This apart, ISRO will be launching French satellite SPOT-7 during the first quarter of 2014, Radhakrishnan said.

"There will be four more small foreign satellites that would go along with SPOT-7," he added.

ISRO had launched the SPOT-6 satellite in 2012.

Read more @ http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/isro-enmap-satellite-spot-7-satellite-k-radhakrishnan-pslv-rocket-mars-orbiter/1/326376.html

Nuclear capable Dhanush Ballistic Missile successfully test fired

India on 23 November 2013 successfully test-fired its nuclear-capable Dhanush ballistic missile from a naval ship off Odisha coast.

The surface-to-surface Dhanush, a naval variant of India's indigenously developed Prithvi missile, was test fired from a location at Bay of Bengal by the Srategic Force Command of the defence force.

The single-stage, liquid propelled Dhanush has already been inducted into the armed services. It is one of the five missiles developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation under the Integrated Guided Missile Development Programme.

Dhanush missile is capable of carrying conventional as well as nuclear payload of 500 to 1000 kg and hit both land and sea-based targets. - See more at: http://www.jagranjosh.com/current-affairs/india-successfully-test-fired-nuclear-capable-dhanush-ballistic-missile-1385197216-1#sthash.tqQieCuH.dpuf

Mars Orbiter Mission payloads

Mars Orbiter Mission carries five payloads: For atmpospheric studies: Layman Alpha Photometer (LAP): It is an absorption cell photometer. It measures the relative abundance of deuterium and hydrogen from Lyman-alpha emission in the Martian upper atmosphere (typically Exosphere and exobase). Measurement of D/H (Deuterium to Hydrogen abundance ratio) allows us to understand especially the loss process of water from the planet. Methan Sensors for Mars (MSM): It is designed to measure methane (CH4) in the Martian atmosphere with PPB accuracy and map its source. Data is acquired only over illuminated scene as the sensor measures the reflected solar radiation. Methane concentration in the Martian atmosphere undergoes spatial and temporal variations. For particle environment studies: Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA): It is a quadruple mass spectrometer capable of analysing the neutral composition in the range of 1 to 300 amu with unit mass resolution. The heritage of this p…

India launches spacecraft to Mars

In keeping with expectations, the Indian Space Research Organisation's (ISRO) trusted workhorse, the PSLV rocket, delivered a perfect launch to India's ambitions of reaching the Red Planet by parking the Mangalyaan spacecraft precisely outside Earth on Tuesday. The 43-minute launch aboard the PSLV C25 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, some 80 km from Chennai, saw the Mangalyaan spacecraft placed in an argument of perigee of 282.75 degrees which was considered necessary to enable the actual 400 million km transition towards Mars on November 30. It was a textbook launch for the Mangalyaan spacecraft — the 25th successful mission carried out by the PSLV rocket — and its progress through the 43-minute launch phase — the longest ever for a PSLV — went on cue, with the crucial third stage rockets firing at 33 minutes and the rocket initiating satellite separation at 43 minutes. "The PSLV 25 has placed the Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) very preci…